Bachelor of Science in Homeland Security

Curriculum Sequence

Course   Credits Weeks
GEN 310E Critical Thinking and Online Study 4 7
CRJ 305E Securing the Homeland 4 7
HLS 300E Administering Homeland Security 4 7
HLS 301E Homeland Security: Issues and Impact 4 7
HIS 320E History of Terrorism 4 7
POL 340E Systems of International Terrorism 4 7
POL 341E Systems of Domestic Terrorism 4 7
CRJ 470E Advanced Issues in Terrorism 4 7
POL 320E International Legal Systems 4 7
POL 321E The Constitution and the Patriot Act 4 7
POL 422E International Political Systems and Homeland Security 4 7
MGT 375E Principles of Emergency Management 4 7
HLS 402E Managing Natural Disasters 4 7
HLS 403E Managing Manmade Disasters 4 7
HLS 475E Capstone in Homeland Security 4 7

 

Course Descriptions

GEN 310E Critical Thinking and Online Study
This course provides an introduction to the expectations and methodology of college-level online learning and critical thinking. Through readings, discussion, and writing assignments, the course examines critical thinking and communication skills as they are used in the analysis of significant ideas. The course specifically addresses the challenges of online self-directed learning, the demands of online communication, the conventions of academic research, and the study and personal skills required for success as an adult student. Study team dynamics, library orientation, and learning style assessment are also included.
 
CRJ 305E Securing the Homeland
This course provides the students with an introduction to the role of Homeland Security and discusses the concept of the rule of law in defending the homeland. Students investigate problems and solutions relating to the tactics for defending borders, tactics for defending coasts, tactics for defending critical infrastructures, tactics for defending aviation security, tactics for defending information technology, and tactics for defending our communities. The course will discuss the role of intelligence in Homeland Security.
 
HLS 300E Administering Homeland Security
This course examines the administration of homeland security. Students will review the formation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) from pre-existing agencies and evaluate how this impacts both the functions and the functioning of DHS. Students will investigate the responsibilities of various federal, state and local political entities and compare the role of domestic law enforcement vs. the role of the military. The course will also introduce the determination of potential terrorist targets, examine the differences between actual and symbolic targets of terrorism, discuss financing the war on terror, and explore the administration and cost of the response to natural disasters.
 
HLS 301E Homeland Security: Issues and Impact
The course presents, examines, and discusses practical issues related to Homeland Security including domestic and international travel, immigration and civil rights, international relations, and consequences of the recent war on terror, especially the resultant political extremism. Students will examine Homeland Security failures and successes by both domestic and foreign governments, evaluate means to correct the failures, and propose methods to capitalize on the successes. In addition, students will explore the impact of Homeland Security on the average citizen and the impact of Homeland Security on commerce.
 
HIS320E History of Terrorism
This course is an in-depth, historical examination of terrorism, providing the student with a working definition of terrorism and exploring the development of terrorism and terrorist tactics. The course will discuss the difference between terrorist acts and ordinary criminal activity and focus on providing the background necessary to understand the evolution, proliferation, and mutation of terrorism. Students will evaluate the varying efforts of nations around the world in deterring, detecting and combating terrorism.
 
POL 340E Systems of International Terrorism
The course will examine international terrorism in detail, including the definition, origins, history, tactics and behavior of international terrorists. Students will compare and contrast motivation, specifically the differences between politically motivated terrorists, nationally or ethnically motivated terrorists, and religiously motivated terrorists. The course will also examine terrorist networks and the financing of international terrorism.
 
POL 341E Systems of Domestic Terrorism
The course will examine domestic terrorism in detail, including the origins of terrorism within the United States as well as a definition and explanation of the tactics and behaviors of domestic terrorists. The course will attempt to classify terrorism within the area of criminal justice by exploring the definition and differences between terrorist acts and non-terrorist related criminal acts. The course will provide an introduction to related concepts such as eco-terrorism, militias, conspiracies and anti-abortion violence.
 
CRJ 470E Advanced Issues in Terrorism
This course will focus on advanced issues in domestic and international terrorism, including technological, cyber, nuclear, biological, and chemical terror concerns. Topics will include the effect of the media on terrorism, the effect of terrorism on constitutional and civil liberties, the financing of terrorism, and the management of a terrorist incident. Students will examine the efforts of nations around the world in deterring, detecting and combating terrorism, their strategies and responses, and what the United States can learn from them. Students will reflect on whether the Homeland Security policies of the United States have strengthened or strained relations with our allies, how they may have changed relations with our enemies, and whether the United States is actually safer now than it was before 9/11.
 
POL 320E International Legal Systems
This course provides an introduction to international legal systems and investigates how those legal systems affect the administration of Homeland Security in the United States. The course will examine how the United States interacts with the world community in a legal sense. Students will explore the multiple forums that apply to international legal issues and the ways in which these forums complicate the imposition of Homeland Security processes by the United States.
 
POL 321E The Constitution and the Patriot Act
This course provides the student with a solid introduction to and understanding of the Constitution of the United States and its relationship to issues involving Homeland Security. Students will examine the Patriot Act and discuss related issues involving civil liberties and civil rights. Course topics include the roles of federal, state and local law enforcement authorities, as well as the effect of the Patriot Act on the investigation and dismantling of terrorist organizations.
 
POL 422E International Political Systems and Homeland Security
This course provides an introduction to and overview of international political systems and focuses on the manner in which those political systems affect the Homeland Security of the United States. Course activities will examine the ways in which the United States interacts with the world community economically, politically, and socially. Students will evaluate the ways in which national interests, diplomacy, and economic power complicate the imposition of Homeland Security processes by the United States.
 
MGT 375E Principles of Emergency Management
This course introduces the principles of emergency management, including an understanding of how to perform a local hazard assessment for an organization or community, the development of a response plan, and an introduction to the management of large scale incidents. Students will examine the concept of disaster recovery for organizations and communities and the parallel concept of disaster recovery as it concerns information technology. Instruction will address the role of first responders to an incident, financing issues for emergency management and the process of securing grants from the Department of Homeland Security.
 
HLS 402E Managing Natural Disasters
This course examines the management of non-manmade disasters such as intense storms, hurricanes, tornados, floods, earthquakes, fires, drought, diseases, or epidemics. The course will discuss principles of prior strategic planning for a large incident, including preparation of emergency operation plans, the role of incident command, the role of planning during an incident, resource management, reentry, and cleanup. The specific emergency management demands and challenges of each disaster will be reviewed through the use of case studies.
 
HLS 403E Managing Manmade Disasters
This course examines the management of manmade disasters such as chemical, biological or radiological spills; the deployment of weapons of mass destruction; a nuclear radiation release; or transportation catastrophe. Building upon the last course, students will apply the principles of prior strategic planning for a large incident, emergency operation plans, incident command, disaster response planning, and resource management. Specific emergency management demands and challenges will be reviewed through the use of case studies.
 
HLS 475E Capstone in Homeland Security
This capstone course integrates the knowledge and skills learned in the previous courses, asking students to demonstrate integrative thinking and the ability to transfer theoretical knowledge from one setting to another. Using simulations and case studies, individuals and groups will apply theory to real situations, analyze situations, employ appropriate problem solving, demonstrate effective planning, and function effectively as a team. Each group will develop an emergency disaster plan for a specific community and event, as well as analyze its effectiveness as a team. Each student will evaluate his/her own growth and development in a series of reflective essays and problem solving responses.
 

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Why Medaille College?

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  • Degree programs taught by faculty working in the field
  • Fully online programs for even more flexibility

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